It's been documented to death how The Pre-Fabs copied off of the Fabs. Their TV show, their zany antics, their music...all of it is said to be derivative from The Beatles. And while I will not deny that the whole concept for the Monkees and style of directing on the show was inspired by the Beatles, not EVERYTHING they ever did is a copycat of the Beatles. And in fact, in some instances, The Beatles copied The Monkees! Don't believe me, let's take a look at the evidence.


-John Lennon was an avid television fan. Especially after they stopped touring. Apparently he would lie on the couch all day, eat cornflakes, and watch television. During 1967, his favorite show happened to be The Monkees. As he told Nez, "I've never missed one of your programmes." Well in the second season, during the "Daydream Believer" video, the Monkees make fun of the fact that they supposedly can't play their own instruments. Micky sticks his hand through the tambourine and never plays on the beat, Nez plays his guitar with his tie over it, etc. This video was filmed in the Summer of '67 and first aired on 10-9-67 (ironically, John Lennon's birthday). Here's a picture from that clip:



Months later, The Fabs shot a clip for their latest single "Hello Goodbye" which aired on Ed Sullivan and such. In the video, John is seen playing his accoustic guitar with his tie over it. Last time I checked, that wasn't a normal guitar playing procedure. Was John paying tribute to Nez? Did the two of them call eachother and plan to start a new tie-over-the-guitar playing trend? Why did John copy Nez?



-In early 1967, Davy Jones started his own record label called "David Jones Records" (or something boring like that), in early 1968 The Beatles started their own record label, Apple Records.

-Davy Jones started his own clothes boutique/Far East/head-shop paraphenelia called Zilch in Greenwich Village in October 1967. The Beatles also opened a clothes boutique/Far East/head-shop paraphenelia store in London in December 1967 or early 1968 called the Apple Shop. Their store lost tons of money and closed after a few months, Davy's was somewhat successful and lasted a few years.

-The Monkees used the Moog Synthesizer in 1967 and were the first to do so on a pop album. The Beatles used a Moog Synthesizer TWO YEARS LATER on Abbey Road. Of course, The Beatles got all of the credit for being the first to use it on an album and the Monkees got jack shit.

-The Monkees began recording "The Birds, The Bees and The Monkees" in late 1967. They each recorded and produced their songs separately and only one song features more than one Monkee. In mid 1968, The Beatles began work on "The Beatles". For the first time, they worked on their songs separately, sometimes only one or two Beatles would appear on one song together.

-After buying $100 worth of old 78 records from the 1920s, Nez wrote "Magnolia Simms" and recorded it as if it was made in the 1920s complete with scratches, pops, and record skipping. It appeared on "The Birds, The Bees, and The Monkees" (BBM) and was released in May 1968. On "The Beatles" (released in December 1968), Paul wrote a song called "Honey Pie" in the style of a 1920s song complete with record scratches.

-On BBM, Nez's wife Phyllis, an aspiring singer, sang backing vocals on "Auntie's Municipal Court". On "The Beatles", John Lennon's girlfriend Yoko Ono, an aspiring shrieker, "sang" on "The Continuing Story of Bungalow Bill" and sang backing vocals on "Birthday" with Pattie Harrison.

-On BBM, The Monkees record their first blatant protest song, "Zor and Zam". On "The Beatles", The Beatles record their first blatant protest song "Revolution 1".

-The Monkees record "Cuddly Toy" by Harry Nilsson in May 1967 and include it on their third album, released in November 1967 and rave about him in interviews. No one takes notice. The Beatles hear of Nilsson (possibly from the Monkees) and during a press conference in mid-1968, begin raving about how good he is. The Beatles then get all the credit for discovering Nilsson.


more to come soon!


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